SAVE THE DATE! RFB’s 4th Anniversary Celebration: Friday, June 14th!

RFB TURNS FOUR! We are super excited to announce Radio Free Brooklyn’s four-year anniversary celebration and want you to join us on Friday, June 14, from 6-10pm, at Tradesman Bar, 222 Bushwick Avenue in Bushwick! In just four years, RFB has grown from an idea that came to life in the basement of a Bushwick bike shop, to a multi-studio 501(c)3 community radio platform and media education space, and we are truly thankful for the opportunity to share what Brooklyn sounds like to the world. So come celebrate with us—we’d love to share this evening with all of you! From 6-10 pm on June 14th, RFB friends, supporters, and hosts past and present will gather at Tradesman in Bushwick for an evening of music, mingling, drinking and fun – and we’d love for you to join us!  Also available will be RFB merch for sale at cost, cupcakes, and tarot card readings.  Directions are bbelow, and we hope to see you there! RFB’s 4th anniversary party is free with a $5 suggested donation. For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/447559566006143/

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THREE MINUTES, THREE QUESTIONS with RFB’S inaugural podcast, “I ART NY”

RFB Editorial Director Michele Carlo gets the story behind the stories of  “I ART NY” podcast hosts Izabela Gola and Rebecca Major. MC: You are both accomplished artists and curators. What do each of you bring to “I ART NY” that makes your viewpoint(s) unique? RM: I developed an interest with the interview format several years ago during my MFA studies. My aim is to formulate insightful and hopefully thought-provoking questions about an artist (or curator’s) work and through that conversation the listener will gain an understanding of the artist/curator’s creative process, intent, and accomplishments. And be entertained as well. IG: I inherited a love for visual arts from my mother who is a painter. When I was a kid growing up in Poland I was surrounded by my mom’s paintings, art books, and her friends from the art world. To be an artist as a career path was natural for me. I am myself a hybrid, as I am a visual artist and an independent curator. My current position at the Polish Cultural Institute of New York brings me opportunities to meet interesting and influential people from the art world, such as Marie-Ève Lafontaine, an independent international curator of

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NEW SHOW INTERVIEW: The Non-Resident Alien Show

Editorial volunteer Emily Scott interviews one of RFB’s latest hosts, Benjy Barnett. Photo of Benjy: Emily Scott; Artwork: Rafael Fuchs. RFB: So I understand you’re from the UK originally—what brings you to Brooklyn? BB: I got a job at NYU once I finished my graduate studies in England. It was just an excuse to get out of England, live in New York for a couple of years. Yeah, it was just a stroke of luck, really. I was scrolling through Twitter when I should have been revising for my exams and I saw this job advertised. So I just applied, and then one thing led to another and I ended up getting it. It was pretty serendipitous. RFB: So what’s the job, if you don’t mind me asking? BB: I’m a researcher in a neuroscience lab. RFB: Fancy! BB: Yes, it sounds fancy, haha. I do research on the way that gender stereotypes affect our perception of men and women. RFB: Cool! So, your new show on RFB, “The Non-Resident Alien Show,” offers musical selections from around the world. How do you find the music you play? BB: It’s a little bit of everything, really. Record shopping is a big

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RFB ARTIST PROFILE: NANABCOOL

RFB editorial volunteer Samantha Ding recently interviewed Ghanaian-American artist NanaBcool at his album release show at Baby’s All Right in Williamsburg. RFB: How did you get your stage name? NanaBcool: My real name is Nana and my last name starts with a “B.” I used to get angry a lot when I was in college and I would say to myself, “Nana, be cool.” And I also just have a fascination with the word “cool.” I used to listen to The Cool Kids and wished I was in a group called something like that. Then Lupe Fiasco put out an album called, “The Cool,” and I was like, I need to find a way to add it to my name—so I did. RFB: You’re Ghanaian-American. Does that influence your music? NanaBcool: For sure! You get a little glimpse of it in my latest project, in the songs “Godiva” and “Come Thru.” I’m trying to work in Afrobeat, but it’s not going to be typical. I grew up listening to a lot of highlife music, which I would describe as the Ghanaian version of reggae music. And Afrobeat is Ghana’s version of dancehall. RFB: How was growing up in Ohio? NanaBcool:

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